Borrowing – Atos Victims Group http://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 20:37:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1.png Borrowing – Atos Victims Group http://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/ 32 32 New CEI Paper Revisits Viral Exchange on Payday Loan Rates by Katie Porter and Kathy Kraninger. https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/advantages-of-applying-for-an-alternative-financial-service/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/advantages-of-applying-for-an-alternative-financial-service/#respond Mon, 03 May 2021 12:35:10 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/?p=633 It’s not every day an exchange about a technical measurement for loans goes viral on social media. During a 2019 House Committee on Financial Services hearing, Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA) pressed then-Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) Director Kathy Kraninger to calculate the cost of a payday loan, using the federal government’s official measure of annual percentage rate […]]]>

It’s not every day an exchange about a technical measurement for loans goes viral on social media. During a 2019 House Committee on Financial Services hearing, Rep. Katie Porter (D-CA) pressed then-Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) Director Kathy Kraninger to calculate the cost of a payday loan, using the federal government’s official measure of annual percentage rate (APR). If you need to find a payday loan, you should use Bridge payday here to provide you with the money you need. 

During her questioning, Rep. Porter posed the hypothetical example of a single mother who had hastily obtained a payday loan to fix her car so she could get to work on time. She took out a two-week $200 payday loan with a $20 interest charge and a $20 origination fee. After explaining the example, she asked Kraninger to calculate the APR of the loan. Kraninger replied that the hearing was supposed to be “a policy conversation” and “not a math exercise.” Porter cut off Kraninger, saying she was “reclaiming my time,” before Kraninger had a chance to answer. The problem is that it was difficult for Kraninger to give a clear answer.

APR is the mathematical calculation that adds up the amount financed, interest, fees, and payment schedule into the cost of credit expressed as a yearly rate. Its disclosure is required by laws that govern all types of loans, including those with durations of much less than a year.

However, as Matthew Adams and I point out in a new CEI paper, APR disclosure rules have led to a distorted view of short-term lending. Under the traditional formula for calculating APR, the loan in Rep. Porter’s example would total a colossal 520 percent interest rate. However, the single mother in question would only have had to pay 20 percent interest, or $40, if she paid back the loan on time, within the two-week duration of the typical payday loan.

Hardly any of Kraninger’s critics were asking how long it typically takes borrowers to pay off these loans and what polic ymakers can do to align disclosure rules with what they actually pay. Adams’s and my paper looks at those vital questions and proposes solutions to help foster a competitive market in short-term lending that can help struggling consumers. We hope you enjoy and get some insights from it.

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Inside DC’s Pandemic-Fueled Real Estate Boom https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/inside-dcs-pandemic-fueled-real-estate-boom/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/inside-dcs-pandemic-fueled-real-estate-boom/#respond Mon, 03 May 2021 07:27:18 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/?p=360 On a blue-sky Saturday last September, David Abrams arrived a half hour early to his listing at 4 Wynkoop Court in Bethesda. He made his way through the checklist of new tasks that real-estate agents have had to master during the pandemic: opening windows, setting up hand-sanitizer stations, wiping down surfaces. Abrams anticipated that the […]]]>

On a blue-sky Saturday last September, David Abrams arrived a half hour early to his listing at 4 Wynkoop Court in Bethesda. He made his way through the checklist of new tasks that real-estate agents have had to master during the pandemic: opening windows, setting up hand-sanitizer stations, wiping down surfaces.

Abrams anticipated that the three-bedroom midcentury-modern would attract considerable attention, given its unusual architecture and desirable location. But he wasn’t prepared for what he saw out the window 15 minutes before go time. The line of people was dozens long and already snaking around the cul-de-sac. Abrams felt his anxiety spike. Is this safe?, he wondered.

It was six months into a global pandemic. Nationally, 740 people were succumbing to coronavirus every day. Public-health officials were advising Americans to avoid crowded places and indoor gatherings. And millions of people were out of work.

For a time, agents had reason to believe they could wind up among them. Washington’s bustling real-estate market slammed on the brakes when Covid first hit last spring. Buyers called off their searches. Sellers pulled listings. Those in the real-estate industry panicked. BEST HOUSING MARKET IN A DECADE COULD SUCCUMB TO CORONAVIRUS, warned a March 2020 Bloomberg headline.

“It was like, We’re never going to sell a house again,” recalls Hans Wydler, who has been in the business 20 years.

“I was a zombie,” says Alexandria agent Micki MacNaughton. “I told my husband, ‘Cancel everything we don’t need.’ I’m like, ‘Are we watching Hulu? Cancel that.’ ”

But by the time the shoppers were lined up at 4 Wynkoop, agents didn’t have to worry about paying for Hulu—though they might not have had time to watch it. The market was more frenzied than it had been in 15 years. July had been the most expensive month ever for DC-area real estate.

On one level, the situation was a searing example of Washington’s status as one of the nation’s most unequal regions: Despite soaring unemployment, despite shuttered restaurants and shops, despite the many residents struggling to afford groceries, the local homebuying population had not only grown wealthier—it was hungrily looking for a change of scenery.

That’s the big national story, at any rate. Down on the pavement, where crowds were lining up in places like Bethesda, it meant that would-be homebuyers were feeling like gladiators. And it meant that professionals such as David Abrams were suddenly feeling more like traffic cops—and public-health monitors—than like listing agents. As he stood on the porch chatting with people who’d waited 40 minutes to get in, he did his best to enforce social distancing. “The way I could tell how many people were in the house was by the number of shoes at the door,” he says. “I was looking in the window from the front, counting shoes.”

By the end of the afternoon, he estimates that 120 people had come through. On top of that, the home also had more than 115 private showings in six days on the market. When Abrams tallied the offers that rolled in, he could hardly believe it—20 in all. The house had been listed for $949,000. The triumphant bidders, a pair of lawyers, paid $1.2 million.

Listing agent David Abrams was flooded with offers on this midcentury-modern house in Bethesda. Photograph courtesy of HomeVisit

People in Washington these days don’t really buy houses. They win them. There was the picturesque Tudor in Silver Spring that asked $798,000, then sold for $943,000 after reeling in 22 offers. There was the modern three-bedroom near Glen Echo that also got 22 bids—despite that its owner didn’t allow an open house and required everyone who made a private appointment to first show proof of approval by a lender. That one asked $899,000 and sold for more than $1.1 million.

There was the place in North Cleveland Park, where so many people wanted to get in that listing agent Amy Levin had to reprogram the lockbox to allow for 24-hour access. The brick Colonial was priced at $1.595 million and got $1.775 million. After that, says Levin, “I called the 12 other people I’ve ever sold houses to over there and was like, ‘You’ve gotta get your house on the market.’ ”

And then there was the five-bedroom in Alexandria with the great backyard. On the afternoon of the open house, listing agent Marian Rosaaen turned onto the cul-de-sac and at first couldn’t make sense of the crowd: “Hand to God, I said, ‘Is someone having a block party right now?’ ” The home, listed for $624,500, got 54 offers. Fifty-four. (As of press time, the sale hadn’t closed.)

Interviews with more than two dozen local agents turn up similar stories from one side of the Beltway to the other, one jaw-dropping scenario after another. They also reveal an explanation for what’s going on—a trend that long preceded the calamitous arrival of Covid.

As anyone who’s tried to buy a house in the last decade knows, Washington has been in the throes of a worsening housing shortage since the Great Recession. The last time the area had a six-month supply of homes for sale—the threshold for a balanced market—was nearly 12 years ago, according to the real-estate site UrbanTurf. For the past couple of years, the supply has hovered mostly between one and a half and two months, according to Bright MLS, the listing service that local agents use. All the while, prices have risen and regional leaders have fretted about housing costs scaring away the middle class and damaging the region’s ability to compete.

Now add in a global health crisis that dramatically changed what people wanted out of their houses, a big population of white-collar Washingtonians whose job security has been unscathed by Covid, a Wall Street hot streak that has helped the stock portfolios of affluent buyers, and interest rates below 3 percent. The result? A surge in extremely motivated house-hunters fighting over an even more depleted number of options. The latest data, in fact, shows that inventory has plummeted to a one-month supply, meaning that if new listings were to dry up entirely, currently available houses would sell out in a mere four weeks.

So far, there’s little hope for improvement: Though they might be tempted by the potentially astronomical profits, plenty of would-be sellers remain on the sidelines thanks to Covid’s distorting impact on the law of supply and demand. It’s hard to put your house up for sale, after all, when you’re not sure where you’ll be able to go next.

This Tudor in Silver Spring asked $798,000, and sold for $943,000. Listing agent Liz Brent says the house got 22 offers.

So the mad scramble gets madder. “I’ve been a bouncer at some of our open houses,” says Alexandria agent Brittany Patterson. “We’ve seen people try to cut in line. It’s a little like kindergarten.”

Another reason showings need crowd control is that a lot of sellers are loath to let too many people in—either to limit their exposure to the virus or simply because they’re stuck at home. Such was the case with a townhouse in a beyond-the-Beltway part of Silver Spring,­ on the market for less than $500,000. It had been listed on a Thursday, with an offer deadline only two days later. “The owner was still living in the house and was working, so there were huge chunks of time you couldn’t get in. It was booked solid,” says agent Peggy Ferris, whose clients were desperate to see it.

Tellingly, the inconvenient situation didn’t hurt the sale. In a last-ditch attempt, Ferris and her buyers decided to show up without an appointment. “We sat outside trying to get in at, like, 5:30 at night before the offers were presented,” says Ferris. Finally, word came down from the seller’s agent—they already had 15 offers. No one else would be allowed inside.

In fact, the real house-hunter’s dream is to avoid the insanity altogether by finding a home before it’s publicly listed. A couple I’ll call Ben and Lisa (who, to speak candidly about finances, didn’t want their real names used) thought they had struck gold when their agent, Jen Walker, got a lead on a Rosemont house whose owners wanted to sell off-market. As far as Ben and Lisa knew, they were the first ones in the door. They fell in love, booked an inspection for the very next morning, and handed in a full-price contract that night. Then . . . silence. Turns out a neighbor had seen their home inspector, caught on to what was happening, and swooped in with an all-cash offer. “It was just like, Are you kidding me?” says Lisa.

About a month later, in September, Walker emailed with another option. She knew a developer with approved plans to build a five-bedroom house, also in Rosemont. One catch: It would cost about $300,000 more than Ben and Lisa’s original $1.5-million budget. And another thing: It might not be finished until August 2021. At that point, Ben and Lisa—along with their dog and toddler son—had been quarantining in their two-bedroom Logan Circle condo since March. Every trip outside required navigating a germ gauntlet of shared door handles and elevator buttons. “We have a two-year-old who wants to put whatever’s closest at hand into his mouth,” explains Ben.

But August sounded better than never. They went for it.


If the booming prices are a continuation of a longstanding reality, the contours of the current market represent a dramatic shift from recent trends. For the better part of the 21st century, as the urban population swelled and public policy reoriented to promote transit and walkable neighborhoods, the condo market shot up—in central DC as well as in built-up suburbs like Bethesda and Arlington. Things were more sluggish, on the other hand, in leafy, car-dependent areas.

But Covid has changed our sense of space, not to mention our interest in sharing that space with strangers. Though the red-hot market has encompassed large parts of the District, the blocks upon blocks of glassy new condos and apartments are distinctly cold. More people in the city tried to unload those units in 2020 than ever before on record, with condo inventory up by 17 percent compared with 2019. Arlington and Bethesda also saw a deluge of condos hit the market—their inventories were up by nearly 30 percent and 13 percent, respectively.

So many buyers wanted to see this North Cleveland Park house that listing agent Amy Levin had to reprogram the lockbox to allow 24-hour access. The place sold for $180,000 over asking.

The consensus among agents is that unless a unit has two or more bedrooms and private outdoor space, it’s likely to be a dud, at least for now. There’s the ick factor of communal living, of course, but the contingent of would-be con-do buyers—often a younger demographic on a tighter budget—has also been harder hit economically. Meanwhile, the other population of recent condo buyers—baby boomers downsizing to an urban pied-à-terre—are newly aware of their vulnerability and less keen on moving downtown. Plus, with their twentysomething kids moving home due to the pandemic, they’re temporarily no longer empty-nesters.

“This was the first time in a very, very long time that we had move-in-ready, almost underpriced product just sitting on the market,” says broker Lindsay Dreyer of her condo listings. She points to a unit she sold in the fall—a one-bedroom in Columbia Heights. “When I chatted with [the seller], I was like, ‘If you sold a year ago, we could have gotten 325 or 330.’ ” Instead, the listing spent more than a month on the market before settling for $299,000.

A Roller Coaster Year

Highlights of the pandemic market

April ’20: Amid Covid-19 lockdowns, the number of homes listed for sale this month in the Washington area dropped by more than 37 percent compared with the previous April. The number that went under contract plummeted by 41 percent—the sharpest decline in a decade.

June ’20: With lockdowns loosened—and people growing desperate for more space—the frenzy began. More homes went under contract this month than during any other June in the past decade.

July ’20: Prices were officially soaring. This month, the median cost of DC rowhouses exceeded $800,000 for the first time on record.

October ’20: The median price of single-family detached houses in the District exceeded $1 million for the first time.

December ’20: By the end of the year, the inventory of homes for sale in the area had cratered to one month’s worth of supply for the first time ever. (A six-month supply is considered a balanced market.)

January ’21: The market shows no sign of slowing in the new year. In January, a typically slow month for real estate, listings in Washington lasted an average of only 11 days on the market—15 fewer than in January 2020.

In downtown Bethesda, agent Wendy Banner has a condo that has languished more than 300 days. “It is, in my opinion, a steal,” she says, noting that its location, a block from Metro, would normally have buyers swarming. On the flip side, her mega­mansions farther out haven’t been this popular in more than a decade. “We started getting calls on every listing that we had in Potomac. Houses that could take years to sell were suddenly being snapped up in a couple weeks’ time.”

With vacations on hold, agents say high-end buyers have been clamoring for swimming pools and sport courts. Not to mention that with lending so cheap, they can get more for their money than ever before. The pandemic, which has revived interest in things like several-acre lots, has lifted the fortunes of places such as Potomac and Great Falls, where home prices grew by 6.2 percent and 16.3 percent, respectively, in 2020 after long stretches of flatlining.

But don’t toll the death knell for city living just yet. While it’s true that buyers at the moment seem to be prioritizing space over urban walkability, it’s not as if all the District’s downtown neighborhoods have tanked. Logan Circle, for instance, saw prices rise by more than 11 percent last year. Shaw had modest growth, at about 2.5 percent. The Zip code that includes H Street and NoMa increased by 4.6 percent.

Not everyone is ready to flee to the burbs, after all, and as agents explain it, the pandemic has turned all levels of homeowners into move-up buyers. “What we’re seeing is the young couple who bought a condo a few years ago and now they’re both working from home and, oh, by the way, they had a baby six months ago and they’re all crowding in 600 square feet,” says agent Dana Scanlon. “They’re looking for the next step up—a two-bedroom with a terrace, or a little rowhouse.”


For anyone who lived through the early-aughts boom and bust, the spectacles of 2021-style house-hunting—the lines of would-be buyers stretching down sidewalks, the sight-unseen offers, the giddiness-inducing financing opportunities—might come with a touch of dread. Are we in a bubble?

First, the good news: The answer appears to be no. Unlike during the overheated market of the Bush era—fueled by reckless lending practices and rampant speculation—today’s buyers must endure rigorous vetting to secure a mortgage. In bidding wars, sellers often perform even more due diligence, reviewing competitors’ finances to confirm who truly has the cash to close the deal.

Jeannette Chapman, director of the Stephen S. Fuller Institute at George Mason University, an authority on the regional economy, also emphasizes that as quickly as prices are appreciating, they’re not rising anywhere near as fast as they would in a bubble: The median Washington home value increased by 8.7 percent in 2020. In 2005, leading up to the crash, it rocketed by nearly 22 percent.

But even without a bubble, the situation is worrisome for other reasons. Rather than lifting all ships, this rising tide has exacerbated inequality. Homeownership was already out of reach for a lot of working-class Washingtonians—a disproportionate share of them people of color—before the pandemic. With those same parts of the population bearing much of Covid’s economic and human toll, the prospect of catching up has become considerably bleaker for them.

“For the region, it’s not healthy that we don’t have enough homes at a lot of different price points,” explains Jenny Schuetz, a senior fellow at Brookings. “It’s a danger if the middle class can’t stay—the middle class is a lot of your tax base.”

Programs designed before the Covid boom to help balance opportunities also often don’t work in the current market. Veteran loans, FHA loans, and teacher programs, for example, typically require that financing and appraisal contingencies be included in offers—clauses that allow buyers to get out of a contract if their loan falls through or the home doesn’t appraise for the sale price. But these days, when competing buyers are liable to waive all contingencies, and when sellers scrutinize bids in search of the most conventional financing or all-cash offers, well-intentioned programs can be meaningless.

“We have lots of very vibrant communities here,” says Peter Tatian, the Urban Institute’s research director for greater DC, “and that’s what’s put at risk if housing costs get way out of line with what average working people can afford.”

This modern three-bedroom near Glen Echo was listed for $899,000 and sold for more than $1.1 million. Listing agent Dana Scanlon says it got 22 offers. Photograph by Anice Hoachlander; Design by Kim Gavin Design

Agents and economists do anticipate that the intensity will eventually ebb, at least somewhat. Rather than spawn entirely new buyer preferences, they predict that the pandemic has more likely just accelerated timelines. In other words, many young families crammed into condos were going to want big houses and yards anyway. It’s just that an unprecedented crisis caused more of them to pack up in search of those things seemingly overnight. At some point, the thinking goes, this migration will settle down.

But until then, the lines will keep forming. When he sorted through the stack of offers that came in on 4 Wynkoop Court last fall, Abrams found that 15 of the 20 were for more than $1 million, and most were contingency-free. Surely, amid such aggressive competitors, there were buyers who’d already struck out in multiple other bidding wars.

However, one-half of the winning couple who bought the home, Matthew Aichele, tells me he and his wife visited the open house almost on a whim. From their Penn Quarter condo, they’d been casually perusing online listings, but they hadn’t even hired an agent yet.

Says Aichele: “This was the first house we looked at.”

Unless otherwise stated, statistics about the local real-estate market are from Bright MLS, the listing service that agents in the Washington area use.

This article initially appeared in the April, 2021 issue of Washingtonian.

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Kiama Company Secures Australia’s First Green Loan for Electric Outboard Motors | Illawarra Mercury https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/kiama-company-secures-australias-first-green-loan-for-electric-outboard-motors-illawarra-mercury/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/kiama-company-secures-australias-first-green-loan-for-electric-outboard-motors-illawarra-mercury/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:17:09 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/kiama-company-secures-australias-first-green-loan-for-electric-outboard-motors-illawarra-mercury/ community, outboard motors, outboard, boating, marine, jet skis, Kiama, innovation, finance Kiama business E Class Outboards has partnered with Handypay so that its customers can access a simple and affordable green loan for their soon-to-be-released electric outboards, batteries and jet skis. Recognizing how solar green loans have revolutionized rooftop solar adoption, Lynelle Johnson wanted to […]]]>

community, outboard motors, outboard, boating, marine, jet skis, Kiama, innovation, finance

Kiama business E Class Outboards has partnered with Handypay so that its customers can access a simple and affordable green loan for their soon-to-be-released electric outboards, batteries and jet skis. Recognizing how solar green loans have revolutionized rooftop solar adoption, Lynelle Johnson wanted to be the first to provide access to green loans for marine applications in Australia. Read more: Kiama launched environmentally friendly electric speedboats in Australia. “I was very aware that putting an electric speedboat on your boat involved the purchase of expensive batteries,” she said. “I know in the early days of solar it was a bit of a hindrance because people are looking at the price. So I thought it wouldn’t be great if we could do some kind of payment system. “When I started looking around I called all the building societies and banks that had solar loans and none of them were interested. I ended up joining the Clean Energy Finance Corporation which is government funded to encourage net zero tech and they put me on a consumer lender that would do a green loan. “There are no exit fees, 10 year terms, really competitive rates and the application does not affect your credit score.” Ms Johnson said there were two loans available. She said it was great to be involved in a premiere, but she’s not keeping the idea to herself. She told her competitors because she thinks helping the environment is so important. “We don’t apply for a loan or an appraisal. Handypay does all of this,” she said. Ms Johnson said E Class Outboards will be launching electric jet skis soon and Green Navy loans could be used for those as well. This implies that we find existing jet skis. The first is under development and will be in testing soon. “Read more: We depend on subscription revenues to support our journalism. If you can, please register here. If you are already a subscriber, please your Sign up to receive news emails below …

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France targets Germany and other EU states for failing to ratify Covid fund https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/france-targets-germany-and-other-eu-states-for-failing-to-ratify-covid-fund/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/france-targets-germany-and-other-eu-states-for-failing-to-ratify-covid-fund/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:17:07 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/france-targets-germany-and-other-eu-states-for-failing-to-ratify-covid-fund/ The EU’s € 750 billion virus recovery fund agreed last summer requires ratification by all 27 EU states before it can be accessed, but only 16 have so far ratified the plan . The German Constitutional Court last week interrupted ratification in a surprise fashion, after five people filed a challenge that resulted in a […]]]>

The EU’s € 750 billion virus recovery fund agreed last summer requires ratification by all 27 EU states before it can be accessed, but only 16 have so far ratified the plan .

The German Constitutional Court last week interrupted ratification in a surprise fashion, after five people filed a challenge that resulted in a temporary injunction.

The plaintiffs argued that the EU should not pool debt, but that it is up to each country to take out its own loan to pay for the stimulus.

“I promised the French that European money would arrive at the beginning of the summer, at the beginning of July. I would like to be able to keep this promise and I would like Europe to understand that we must not wait before being able to spend this money, ”French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire told CNews television channel.

He said there were “states like Germany which impose additional deadlines”, referring to the Constitutional Court’s ruling.

“I see the American cavalry got there on time, the money is there, the United States has their money,” he said.

“I would like the European cavalry to arrive on time as well.

(article continues below)

See also on The Local:

The Mayor said “Growth is needed now, recovery is needed now. In 2022 or 2023 it will be too late, the Chinese and the Americans will have overtaken us “.

The European Commission on Monday expressed hope that the German court’s ruling would not delay ratification for long, saying the legality of the stimulus package was “in order”.

The historic offer of loans and grants to the EU countries hardest hit by the pandemic, funded by joint borrowing from all members, has marked a paradigm shift in Germany and other countries long opposed to it. liability for the debts of other members.

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Indian loan against real estate markets, 2016-2020 and 2021-2026 by property type, loan type, interest rate, source, tenure, region and company https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/indian-loan-against-real-estate-markets-2016-2020-and-2021-2026-by-property-type-loan-type-interest-rate-source-tenure-region-and-company/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/indian-loan-against-real-estate-markets-2016-2020-and-2021-2026-by-property-type-loan-type-interest-rate-source-tenure-region-and-company/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:17:05 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/indian-loan-against-real-estate-markets-2016-2020-and-2021-2026-by-property-type-loan-type-interest-rate-source-tenure-region-and-company/ DUBLIN, March 26, 2021 / PRNewswire / – The “Indian Loan Against The Real Estate Market, By Property Type (Independent Residential, Rented Residential Property, Commercial Property, Independent Land), By Loan Type, By Interest Rate, By Source, By Term Occupancy, By Region, Forecast and Opportunity, report FY2026 “has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com offer. Indian loan against […]]]>

DUBLIN, March 26, 2021 / PRNewswire / – The “Indian Loan Against The Real Estate Market, By Property Type (Independent Residential, Rented Residential Property, Commercial Property, Independent Land), By Loan Type, By Interest Rate, By Source, By Term Occupancy, By Region, Forecast and Opportunity, report FY2026 “has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com offer.

Indian loan against real estate market is expected to grow at a CAGR of over 14% in terms of value to reach 857.87 billion USD by fiscal year 2026.

These loans offer large sums with low interest rates as well as longer repayment terms, thus stimulating the market. The loan against property works in favor of the borrower’s wishes as the borrower remains the owner of the property by law for the term of the loan and has the right to repay the loan according to his or her financial standing, attributing in besides the growth of India real estate market.

In addition, a home equity loan can be taken out for medical emergencies, education, marriages, business start-up / expansion, and other family needs by providing a large amount of cash.

The Indian property loans market is segmented on the basis of property type, loan type, interest rate, source, tenure, region and company. Based on the source, the market is further divided into banks and housing finance companies (HFCs). Of these, the banking segment dominated the market in FY2020, and the trend is expected to continue through FY2026 as they offer lower interest rates while benefiting clients with a myriad of lucrative loan programs.

Depending on the type of loan, the market is further fragmented into personal loan, business loan, construction loan and construction loan, etc. Of these, a commercial loan is expected to dominate the market during the forecast period, followed closely by construction and construction loans, as most small and medium-sized businesses request funds for business purposes and financial.

Some of the market players such as Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited (HDFC), Industrial Credit and Investment Corporation of India Bank Limited (ICICI), Life Insurance Corporation Housing Finance Limited (LIC), Punjab National Bank Housing Finance Limited (PNB), State Bank of India, offering loan-for-property services in Indian banks, are transparent, convenient, secure and hassle-free. They offer various customer focused programs that allow them to improve their customer base.

Key target audience:

  • Loan against real estate banks, end users and other stakeholders
  • Government bodies such as regulators and policy makers
  • Lending Against Property Organizations, Forums and Alliances
  • Market studies and consulting firms

Years considered for this report:

  • Historical years: FY2016-FY2019
  • Reference year: fiscal year 2020
  • Estimated year: FY2021
  • Forecast period: FY2022-FY2026

Main topics covered:

1. Product overview

2. Research methodology

3. Impact of COVID-19 on the Indian Real Estate Loan Market

4. Executive summary

5. Voice of the customer

6. Indian loan versus real estate market outlook
6.1. Market size and forecast
6.1.1. By value
6.2. Market share and forecasts
6.2.1. By type of property (independent residential property, leased residential property, commercial property, independent land and others)
6.2.2. By type of loan (personal loan, commercial loan, building and construction loan, other)
6.2.3. By interest rate (fixed rate, variable rate)
6.2.4. By source (banks and housing finance companies (HFCs))
6.2.5. By seniority (up to 5 years, 6-10 years, 11-24 years, 25-30 years)
6.2.6. By region (North, East, West, South)
6.2.7. By company
6.3. Product market map (by property, by type of loan, by interest rate, by source, by tenure, by region)

7. North India Loan Versus Real Estate Market Outlook
7.1. Market size and forecast
7.1.1. By value
7.2. Market share and forecasts
7.2.1. By type of property
7.2.2. By interest rate
7.2.3. By provenance
7.2.4. By seniority
7.2.5. By the 3 main states

8. East Indian Loan Versus Housing Market Outlook
8.1. Market size and forecast
8.1.1. By value
8.2. Market share and forecasts
8.2.1. By type of property
8.2.2. By interest rate
8.2.3. By provenance
8.2.4. By seniority
8.2.5. By the 3 main states

9. West India Loan vs. Housing Market Outlook
9.1. Market size and forecast
9.1.1. By value
9.2. Market share and forecasts
9.2.1. By type of property
9.2.2. By interest rate
9.2.3. By provenance
9.2.4. By seniority
9.2.5. By the 3 main states

10. South Indian Loan Versus Real Estate Market Outlook
10.1 Market Size and Forecast
10.1.1. By value
10.2 Market share and forecast
10.1.2. By type of property
10.1.3. By interest rate
10.1.4. By provenance
10.1.5. By seniority
10.1.6. By the 3 main states

11. Market dynamics
11.1 Drivers
11.2 Challenges

12. Market trends and developments

13. Political and regulatory landscape

14. Economic profile of India

15. Competitive landscape
15.1 Company Profile
15.1.1 Housing Development Finance Corporation Bank Ltd (HDFC)
15.1.2 Industrial Credit and Investment Corporation of India Bank Limited (ICICI)
15.1.3 Housing Finance Limited (LIC) life insurance company
15.1.4 Punjab National Bank Housing Finance Limited (PNB)
15.1.5 State Bank of India (SBI)
15.1.6 Bank of South India Limited
15.1.7 Indian Bank
15.1.8 Federal Bank Limited
15.1.9 Yes Bank Limited
15.1.10 Axis Bank Limited

16. Strategic recommendations

For more information on this report, visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/bgw5a7

Media contact:

Research and markets
Laura Wood, senior
[email protected]

For EST office hours, call + 1-917-300-0470
For USA / CAN call toll free + 1-800-526-8630
For GMT office hours, call + 353-1-416-8900

US Fax: 646-607-1907
Fax (outside the United States): + 353-1-481-1716

SOURCE Research and Markets

Related links

http://www.researchandmarkets.com

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Deployment inspires folk singer song about Afghanistan https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/deployment-inspires-folk-singer-song-about-afghanistan/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/deployment-inspires-folk-singer-song-about-afghanistan/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:17:02 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/deployment-inspires-folk-singer-song-about-afghanistan/ Pierce Pettis interacts with children from the town of Mazar-e-Sharif in northern Afghanistan during a deployment there in 2010. Now a singer-songwriter, Pettis was inspired by his time at the foreigner for his music. (Pierce Pettis) An American folk / country song about two young lovers on the run is a story as old as […]]]>

Pierce Pettis interacts with children from the town of Mazar-e-Sharif in northern Afghanistan during a deployment there in 2010. Now a singer-songwriter, Pettis was inspired by his time at the foreigner for his music. (Pierce Pettis)

An American folk / country song about two young lovers on the run is a story as old as time. But this one has a twist: it’s set in Afghanistan.

“Lailly and Abdullah” is about Afghan youth in conflict with tradition and features a musician from Alabama singing “Allahu Akbar”.

The unique fusion of America and Afghanistan comes from Major Pierce Pettis, a National Guard who wrote the song after being inspired by one of his overseas deployments.

Pettis said he hopes his song will get people thinking about the lives of the Afghan people, who he says remain mostly unknown to Americans even after 20 years of deploying US troops there.

“Humans care about each other once we get to know each other,” Pettis said in a recent phone interview about the song, which recently featured on Grammy Award-winning Margo Price’s livestream. It has attracted hundreds of views on YouTube.

Pettis – who uses his middle name, Rayvon, in a performance – was deployed to northern Afghanistan in 2010 with the now disbanded 900th Maintenance Company in Alabama.

He returned from deployment and began a musical career, interrupted briefly by another deployment in 2013.

Joseph Harmon, who deployed with Pettis, said Pettis always strummed a low-end guitar.

“This place has left an indelible mark on us all,” said Harmon, now major of the 1200th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion.

As a young logistics officer, Pettis dabbled in civil affairs missions such as building schools and tried to leave the base as much as possible to speak with the people of Balkh province.

“He was always trying to learn more about Afghan culture from the locals,” said Dave Abdullah Ali, an Afghan American who served as an interpreter alongside Pettis.

The song comes from his experiences while deployed, but it’s not about a soldier.

The main characters are two young Afghan lovers who connect with the loss of their parents during the country’s decades of war.

Pettis said the song was inspired by a brief information he heard about two young people unable to marry because they were from different tribes. They were then killed by their families as they tried to escape, he recalls.

The main characters in Pettis’ song also come from different backgrounds. Abdullah is gunned down by a cleric and Lailly is gunned down on her hospital bed when a doctor tells her she needs to be realistic about life.

But Pettis adds another twist: a happy ending. As its original version ended sadly, Pettis said he reworked it after recalling conversations with Afghan friends about how too many Afghanistan stories end badly.

So Abdullah survives and the young couple escapes to start a happy life.

“The same way things can get horrible, they can get surprisingly wonderful,” Pettis said.

lawrence.jp@stripes.com Twitter: @ jplawrence3

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GN Saibaba’s wife condemns dismissal from Delhi University https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/gn-saibabas-wife-condemns-dismissal-from-delhi-university/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/gn-saibabas-wife-condemns-dismissal-from-delhi-university/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:17:00 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/gn-saibabas-wife-condemns-dismissal-from-delhi-university/ Jailed assistant professor Saibaba received a memorandum of his dismissal on March 31 at Ram Lal Anand College, University of Delhi. GN Saibaba’s dismissal is an attempt to intimidate other human rights activists, according to his wife AS Vasantha. The jailed scholar was fired as an assistant professor by Ram Lal Anand College at the […]]]>

Jailed assistant professor Saibaba received a memorandum of his dismissal on March 31 at Ram Lal Anand College, University of Delhi.

GN Saibaba’s dismissal is an attempt to intimidate other human rights activists, according to his wife AS Vasantha. The jailed scholar was fired as an assistant professor by Ram Lal Anand College at the University of Delhi on March 31, a move that drew him harsh criticism from civil society.

Saibaba, who is convicted of his alleged association with Maoists, was removed from his post by the college on March 31.

“The services of Dr GN Saibaba, Assistant Professor, Ram Lal Anand College are terminated with effect from the afternoon of March 31, 2021”, reads the memorandum published by Ram Lal Anand College.

The college’s decision has caused great distress to his wife and family, who are worried about their future, having been deprived of an income. “I’m worried about our loans. My daughter is continuing her post-graduation studies. Our finances are in bad shape. It is a simple harassment on the part of the administration. They want to make an example of us and intimidate other intellectuals, ”Vasantha told TNM.

Saibaba, who is in a wheelchair, is an assistant professor at Ram Lal Anand College. He was arrested in 2014 for allegedly maintaining links with Maoists. Subsequently, he was convicted in 2017 by the Gadchiroli Magistrates’ Court and is serving a prison term in the isolation cell of Nagpur Prison. After his arrest, he receives only 50% of his salary.

The action taken by the University has been described as “arbitrary and in total violation of all principles of natural justice” by the Committee for the Defense and Liberation of Dr. GN Saibaba, which includes activists and intellectuals.

In a statement issued on April 6 calling on the College to reinstate the imprisoned professor, the Committee said: “The Committee for the Defense and Release of Dr. GN Saibaba strongly condemns this arbitrary action and demands that the College and University of Delhi immediately reverse their decision. , and reinstate Dr Saibaba on duty, until his appeal against his conviction is dismissed.

The inquiry committee initiated disciplinary action against Saibaba in May 2017, and the second show cause notice was issued in September 2020, as the jailed professor was recovering from COVID-19. Due to the restrictions imposed in prison due to COVID-19, which did not allow “Mulakaats”, Vasantha had requested time in college, which was taken into account on0. However, they only gave a fortnight to respond.

She responded by stating that Dr Saibaba was unable to respond due to extreme illness and the lockdown due to COVID-19 only made things worse for him. However, without waiting for Dr Saibaba’s response to this second opinion, the College has arbitrarily, and in total violation of all principles of natural justice, terminated its services, ”the Committee said.

Likewise, the Delhi University Teachers’ Association condemned the action of Ram Lal Anand College.

“If the University approved the Board’s decision, it appears to be at odds with its own explicit instruction to issue a further notice of justification to Dr. Saibaba. Once the justification had been given, the college should have waited for the response before taking adverse action in this regard. The decision to end his services without waiting for his response, when he is unable to respond due to prison lockdown conditions and extreme health (which includes positive tests for Covid as well as other life-threatening illnesses) seems arbitrary, vindictive and against the principles of natural justice, ”the statement from DUTA reads.

Inhuman action

Besides intellectuals and rights activists, politicians have also condemned the suppression of Saibaba.

Speaking to TNM, Sravan Dasoju, Congress spokesperson in Telangana, said: “First of all, these are all fabricated cases. They (the government) want to create an environment of threat and intimidation with these cases, and on top of that, the dismissal is nothing but harassment. The message they are trying to get across is that anyone who has an ideology different from that of the ruling party will all be penalized. “

“The dismissal is definitely harassment. It has to be decided by the court. The Congress party does not believe in this kind of unilateral decision. It is undemocratic and contrary to human rights.

TRS MP Keshava Rao also condemned the College’s decision. Stating that Saibaba’s dismissal amounted to a human rights violation, he reportedly said: “It is not correct to remove him from his job while the case is still pending in court. There are several cases where professors have resumed their duties after being acquitted by the court in various cases. ”

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1970: Watch the video of the infamous “Oregon Exploding Whale” incident on the occasion of the 50th anniversary https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/1970-watch-the-video-of-the-infamous-oregon-exploding-whale-incident-on-the-occasion-of-the-50th-anniversary/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/1970-watch-the-video-of-the-infamous-oregon-exploding-whale-incident-on-the-occasion-of-the-50th-anniversary/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:16:56 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/1970-watch-the-video-of-the-infamous-oregon-exploding-whale-incident-on-the-occasion-of-the-50th-anniversary/ Thanks to YouTube and social media, we are able to remember some of the incredible moments of human achievement that were captured on video. And, well, some of the less than amazing. On November 12, 1970, it was decided that the rotting carcass of an eight-ton sperm whale, which had washed up on the shore […]]]>

Thanks to YouTube and social media, we are able to remember some of the incredible moments of human achievement that were captured on video.

And, well, some of the less than amazing.

On November 12, 1970, it was decided that the rotting carcass of an eight-ton sperm whale, which had washed up on the shore of a beach near Florence, Oregon, should be removed.

The method chosen to do this nasty job was dynamite.

A lot. Like a quarter of a ton of explosive.

This, of course, did not go well.

Screaming onlookers fled from the flying whale fat and a car was crushed under a large chunk.

The beach seagulls, which planners had hoped would stay and eat the destroyed pieces, flew away, terrified of the huge explosion.

The moment was captured by the cameras of KATU-TV and reporter Paul Linnman gave an incredible “deadpan” narrative that helped make the moment famous, now 50 years behind schedule.

His best line was:

“The sand dunes over there were covered with earth-loving spectators and journalists, who will soon become fat earth journalists. For the fat bacon that exploded beyond all credible limits.

The video has been viewed over a million times on YouTube and this week the Oregon Historical Society released a “blank update” of the 16-millimeter print.

Read more

1949: The time people tried to detonate thousands of crows and missed them all

1920: Camille’s children feast after an “impromptu chocolate shower”

1965: Darkness! How Syracuse Cured During The “Great Northeast Blackout”

1975: Perfect pet or bigger “spoiled?” »Remember the Pet Rock

Stuck inside? Discover our podcast on real crime

An Upstate NY invention quickly became the preferred method of execution across the United States – the electric chair. In “The Condemned” we trace the history of the chair through the stories of five men who were sentenced to death for their crimes. Discover our series here.

This feature is part of CNY Nostalgia, a section on syracuse.com. Send your ideas and curiosities to Johnathan Croyle at jcroyle@syracuse.com or call 315-427-3958.

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Premier Diversified Holdings Inc. closes loan https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/premier-diversified-holdings-inc-closes-loan/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/premier-diversified-holdings-inc-closes-loan/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:16:54 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/premier-diversified-holdings-inc-closes-loan/ VANCOUVER, British Columbia, December 23, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Premier Diversified Holdings Inc. (“First“or the”Society“) (TSXV: PDH) announces that it has entered into a loan agreement with MPIC Fund I, LP (“MPIC“) for a secured loan with a principal amount of up to $ 40,000 (the”To lend“). The Loan matures on December 21, 2021 and […]]]>

VANCOUVER, British Columbia, December 23, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Premier Diversified Holdings Inc. (“First“or the”Society“) (TSXV: PDH) announces that it has entered into a loan agreement with MPIC Fund I, LP (“MPIC“) for a secured loan with a principal amount of up to $ 40,000 (the”To lend“). The Loan matures on December 21, 2021 and bears interest at the rate of 6% per annum. The Loan is secured by all current and acquired property of the Company and has equal priority with all previously granted loans to the Company. by MPIC The Loan will be used for working capital.

The Company does not issue any securities, nor does it pay any premium, commission or intermediation commission on the Loan. The Loan is repayable at any time without penalty. The Company expects to repay the funding when it receives funds from some of its other investments.

Disclosure of Related Party Transactions

Because MPIC is a controlling person of Premier, the loan constitutes a “related party transaction” within the meaning of Multilateral Instrument 61-101. Protection of holders of minority securities in special transactions (“MI 61-101The loan was found to be exempt from the requirements for obtaining a formal appraisal or minority shareholder approval based on sections 5.5 (b) and 5.7 (1) (f) of NI 61-101.

Premier does not have any securities listed or listed on any of the specified markets listed in section 5.5 (b) of MI 61-101. Premier relies on the exemption from minority shareholder approval in 5.7 (1) (f) of MI 61-101 because the loan was obtained by Premier from MPIC on reasonable commercial terms which are no less advantageous to Premier only if the loan had been obtained from a person dealing at arm’s length with Premier. In addition, the loan is not convertible, directly or indirectly, into shares or voting securities of Premier or any subsidiary of the issuer, or otherwise participating in nature, or repayable in principal or interest. , directly or indirectly, in shares or securities with voting rights. of Premier or a subsidiary of the issuer.

The loan is subject to review and acceptance by the TSX Venture Exchange.

Amended loan agreement with MPIC Fund I, LP.

Premier entered into a loan agreement with MPIC on December 12, 2019 with a principal amount of $ 200,000 and a maturity of December 12, 2020. MPIC and Premier have agreed to extend the maturity date by twelve months until December 13. 2021.

About Premier Diversified Holdings Inc.

Premier Diversified Holdings Inc. participates in diversified industries through its acquisitions of securities and / or assets of public and private entities which it believes have significant return potential. It can act as a holding company (either directly or through a subsidiary) and can participate to varying degrees in the management of subsidiary entities.

On behalf of the board of directors

“Sanjeev Parsad”

Sanjeev Parsad
President, CEO and Director

Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

This press release does not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy, and there will be no sale of securities in jurisdictions in which such an offer, solicitation or sale would be illegal. Any offer made will be in accordance with available prospectus exemptions and limited to persons to whom the securities may be sold in accordance with the laws of those jurisdictions, and to persons authorized to sell the securities in accordance with the laws of those jurisdictions.

Further information relating to the Company is available on SEDAR at www.sedar.com.

Do not broadcast in the United States of America.

Legal Notice Regarding Forward-Looking Statements: This press release contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of applicable Canadian securities laws. Forward-looking statements are stated expectations or intentions. Forward-looking statements contained in this press release include statements regarding the terms of the loan, including the maturity date (s), that PDH will repay the MPIC loans as set out in the press release and that the net proceeds of the loan will be used as indicated in this press release. Release. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially include, but are not limited to, the following: the income that PDH realizes will be insufficient to repay the loans to MPIC, the terms and conditions of the various loans are subject to change, the management or board of directors of PDH may use its income or other funds for other purposes, which the capital raised will be insufficient to accomplish our intentions and the capital alone may not be sufficient to enable us to grow our business, and that additional complications or unforeseen obstacles from COVID-19 may negatively impact Premier and / or MPIC. Investors are cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements. Our policy is not to update any forward-looking statements.

        
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AfDB Approves Loan for Modernization of Electricity Distribution System in Karnataka https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/afdb-approves-loan-for-modernization-of-electricity-distribution-system-in-karnataka/ https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/afdb-approves-loan-for-modernization-of-electricity-distribution-system-in-karnataka/#respond Wed, 07 Apr 2021 23:16:51 +0000 https://atosvictimsgroup.co.uk/afdb-approves-loan-for-modernization-of-electricity-distribution-system-in-karnataka/ The Asian Development Bank (ADB) has agreed to provide a sovereign and non-sovereign loan in the amount of $ 190 million for the upgrade and modernization of the electricity distribution system of the city of Bengaluru in the Indian state of Karnataka. The AfDB will provide a sovereign loan of $ 100 million for the […]]]>

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) has agreed to provide a sovereign and non-sovereign loan in the amount of $ 190 million for the upgrade and modernization of the electricity distribution system of the city of Bengaluru in the Indian state of Karnataka.

The AfDB will provide a sovereign loan of $ 100 million for the Bengaluru energy efficient and energy-smart electricity distribution project and $ 90 million to the Bangalore Electricity Supply Company (BESCOM) without a sovereign guarantee loan.

Teruhisa Oi, AfDB Senior Energy Specialist in South Asia, said: “Reliable and sustainable electricity distribution and service is an important aspect of India’s growth and development.

“We believe this project will improve the efficient distribution and delivery of electricity supply to residents of Bangalore and support the Indian government’s strategy of building an energy efficient distribution network. ”

As part of the project, 7,200 km of overhead distribution lines will be converted into underground cables and laid in parallel with 2,800 km of fiber-optic communication cables.

Fiber optic cables will be used for smart metering systems, distribution automation system (DAS) in distribution network and other communication networks.

In addition, the project will include the installation of 1,700 main automated loop units integrated with the DAS to monitor and control the distribution equipment of the distribution lines from the control center.

The loan granted to BESCOM, one of the state’s five public distribution services, will be used to strengthen the operating and maintenance capacities of its public service, as well as environmental and social guarantees.

The loan will also help BESCOM’s financial management and trade finance capacities.

Mayank Choudhary, Senior Investment Specialist in the AfDB’s Private Sector Operations Department, said: “This presents an innovative financing arrangement, the first of its kind for the AfDB, combining public and private sector loans to a public enterprise. .

“This funding structure reduces BESCOM’s sovereign exposure while helping it mobilize resources for capital spending using a market-based approach.

Last month, the AfDB agreed to support Nepal’s power grid modernization project by approving a concessional loan of $ 156 million.

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